Draconic Dice Crypt Preview

Sometimes you want something in front of you that screams ‘Bring it On!’

I know I have been a bit quiet on the Kickstarter front recently. Partly, this has been because of time and not backing at my usual pace. It has been because all the big projects are getting plenty of press.

Joel from PrintableNerdGear.com got in touch with me recently about his new project. It won’t be for everyone, but for the creative hands-on player, this is a project that has fantastic potential.

Introducing the Draconic Dice Crypt.

If you use this, you are declaring the world yours before you begin

Need no further information? Check out PrintableNerdGear.com and the Kickstarter project here.

Wow, what is that? Wait – it’s a dice-box?

On the surface – yep. You can store your die and miniature in this table talking piece. Oh, and drinks while you are playing. But can you imagine the look on your players’ faces as you set this on the table?

“We have to face what? What is that? Can I cast a spell yet?” The questions come at you fast and quickly as they frantically try and brace for some upcoming boss battle.

“What? This? It’s just my dice box. No big deal.” You say as you continue nonchalantly setting up. Or imagine your new gaming groups faces as you pull out your ‘kit’.

Or maybe you are a Magic: The Gathering player? There will be options to make the Draconic Dice Crypt usable in Magic as well.

Any way you use it, the Draconic Dice Crypt will undoubtedly command attention on the table, and deservedly so.

Looking into the open Crypt. That's right - that's the inside you can see!

But it’s a dice-box. So it’s just a box that holds my dice? What makes it so unique?

Well, apart from the look, the Draconic Dice Crypt is more than an ordinary dice box. There are several sections that you can choose to use for more dice storage, miniature protection, even (if a stretch goal is unlocked) a dice tower that comes from the middle and twists together.

This isn’t just a dice box. To think of it that way is to assume a Ferrari is just a car. What is for sale is an amazingly well-designed game storage system that will be uniquely yours.

There are a lot of storage systems that promise ‘unique’ options for each customer, but you pick from a handful of predefined choices. The Draconic Dice Crypt looks to live up to the promise though. How? Well, it’s a massive model you will need to make yourself. 

Make it yourself?

Just in the same way each mini you paint is yours, the same applies to the Draconic Dice Crypt. It’s more than paint scheme though. You will make the Crypt yourself with a 3D printer. So you can choose your materials and create it all from scratch!

So what am I making?

The body itself quite roomy, and the design includes holes for rare earth magnets (easily buyable from Amazon or the like) to keep the lid secured.

The Draconic Dice Crypt then has four main parts – Lid, Top Insert, Bottom Insert and Bottom Dice Tray insert. Each section will have multiple designs that are going to unlocked during the Kickstarter campaign.

When you back the project, you will be able to print the sections you want as you will receive the files for all unlocked designs. If you wanted to make a few different Draconic Dice Crypts you can whenever you want!

I know I am talking around the Crypt itself, but because it will be personal to you it’s hard to describe why I find it so amazing. Check out the promotional Kickstarter video to see the Crypt in action – images speak louder than words!

It's a couple of days from Live, but look at the insert for the top!

It looks amazing! How much is it?

For Kickstarter backers, the Draconic Dice Crypt will be USD$15. Post the campaign, the cost will be USD$30 and will not have all the same designs, so this is a fantastic deal!

When you look at the project, you will also see a USD$350 option. Before you jam that back now button though, be advised this is for a Commercial license of the Dice Crypt. Only people that will be making these and selling them will need to look at this option; most people will only need the $15 tier for their prints.

So what do I need to make the Draconic Dice Crypt?

Only a 3D printer and patience. Probably best with a mid-tier printer though, you will need one that can take a moderately large print job. My old UP! Mini wouldn’t cut it in one print for example.

The main issue is the size of the body print. You will need a printer that can comfortably print a 7″ x 7″ x 5.1″ (180mm x 180mm x 130mm) print job. This isn’t an issue for the more upscale home printers (e.g. the UP!300), but the sub AUD$1,000 printers probably won’t cut it in one go.

That’s not to say that you can’t make it though – you will need to print the base in multiple parts and glue it together.

Then, of course, to complete the look you will need to paint your creation! Once the project is over, Printable Nerd Gear will be showing off some projects submitted by customers with the #PrintableNerdGear tag. I can’t wait to see what people make of this. I love what people can do already with minis, and this can lead to work of beauty!

That sounds like a lot of work!

Yes, it does. And it won’t be easy on materials either. Joel said that he used about 530 grams of plastic just for the body. Hence my earlier comment about this project not being for everyone.

If you would like someone to make it for you, there are options. I completely forgot to ask Joel about sending the personal file off to a 3D printing service. Still, I would assume this would be within the personal license (especially with a reputable 3D printing service), but I will be asking the question to make sure.

There is also the option of asking backers with Commercial licenses (general questions on the project) for contact details. People that buy this license will be looking for customers so that you could order the build. The cost would cover time and materials, of course, but it would still be a lot cheaper than buying a 3D Printer!

It's a couple of days from Live, but look at the insert for the top!

Will you be backing this?

Probably? It’s an amazing project. My 3D printer is out of action, but that’s not a major hurdle for me.

Full disclosure, I was offered a copy of the unlocked files. I declined because this is the type of project that I love to share, and would have written about in any case.

I honestly want one of these crypts, but I haven’t printed (or painted!) anything in a few years. I am already time-poor, but even if I didn’t use it for games, it would be a fantastic display piece.

For the cost, I think backing the Draconic Dice Crypt will be worth it. Half the final price, all of the options, and I can look into printing and painting when I am ready.

When does the Kickstarter happen?

When else would you start a project based on killing a dragon to hold your dice? HALLOWEEN! 6 pm Eastern for our US friends to be exact. About 10 am on 1/11/2019 AEST, or 9 am for those of us without daylight savings.

You don’t have to wait to check it all out though. You can go to PrintableNerdGear.com and check it all out (and sign up for notification emails), go to the Kickstarter project here.

Have a great week!

JohnHQLD.
This is something awesome to behold. Make sure to check out the Kickstarter!

Watching the Blood on the Clocktower

Blood on the Clocktower Box Art

**QUICK UPDATE: Blood on the Clocktower’s Kickstarter is now live – go check it out!

I’m just a villager.  Wait wrong game!

Social Deduction and Hidden Role games are great to play with a wide range of different people.  Get a dozen or so people together, and watch the shenanigans commence!

The most common examples are Ultimate Werewolf (or the Werewolves of Millers Hollow!) and Mafia, and while they are great to play they share some fundamental problems.

So common problems with these types of games:

  1. Player Elimination – these games can go for over an hour, so if you are the first one out you are going to be really bored for a while.
  2. Little initial information – the first round is normally along the lines of “Hey, you’re wearing a red shirt.  We vote to eliminate you!”.  It takes a few rounds to start getting some real information, so the first few people eliminated are out for no real reason.  This can put people off playing.
  3. It’s a commitment to play – These types of games tend to not allow people to join later or leave if required as it can harm ‘the balance’.  Even if you do just throw someone in, they tend to be the next victim just because they can be which isn’t fun.

So all this in mind, why play these games?  Because once you are in the game, they really are a lot of fun.  But you have to be into the game.  If you are in a group that knows the negatives, having people prepared to sit or play filler games like Love Letter means no one is really put out.  Also, if you do play as an end of the night game, eliminated players can leave without guilt if they so choose.

Newer games like WitchHunt and Two Rooms and a Boom have come a long way in trying to address such issues.  But today I am interested in Blood on the Clocktower, a game by Steven Medway and his Sydney Australian Based team currently being demoed at Origins!

So what makes me so excited about Blood on the Clocktower?

  1. No player elimination – even when you ‘die’, you are still in the game.  And the dead break ties!
  2. Drop in mechanics cooked in – someone gets stuck in traffic, or a random sees you playing and asks what you are doing?  No problem!  Each new player is a Traveller with fixed powers, but if they are ‘good’ or ‘bad’ is to be determined.
  3. No role reveal – experience werewolf players, for example, have an idea of how many werewolves are in a game based on player numbers.  When someone is eliminated and confirms their role, the card counter players get more and more of an advantage while playing.  Not anymore!
  4. Almost all players can bluff that they are someone else – everyone has a ‘cheat sheet’ of all roles, so you can refer to the rules at any time instead of having to try and memorise a bunch of roles immediately.
  5. Drunk and Poison mechanics – I already play this way a little bit when moderating Werewolf, but it’s great to see it actually in the ruleset.  Basically, if you are drunk or poisoned, the moderator can lie to you.  This allows the group to have fun poisoning their teammates (or giving them drinks to get them drunk), and the moderator then has the power to lie to those players.  Personally, I know a few players I will be buying drinks for, just to add to the realism of course 😀
Blood on the Clocktower Contents
The game definitely does a great job of setting the mood. And simple components!
Blood on the Clocktower Townsfolk
Some of the 'good' townsfolk
Blood on the Clocktower Demons
Some Demons from Blood on the Clocktower, or the 'evil' team

So if you have played Werewolf or Mafia type games, you basically already know the basics of how to play the first game Trouble Brewing.  But here is a video of the game being played and their reactions, which really sells the game more than my words ever could.

Wait you said first game?  What are you talking about John?

There will be multiple editions or essentially expansions for the game, with Trouble Brewing as seen in the video being the first or three planned editions.  The expansion titles are ‘Sex and Violence’ and ‘Bad Moon Rising’, so they have my pun vote at the very least!

Altogether, the three titles will give players around 90 characters to play, so changing up games will not be an issue.  And all three editions will be available when the game is released on Kickstarter!  The downside is the Kickstarter looks like it won’t be running until December, so patience will be required.

Or will it?

If you check out the Blood on the Clocktower website, there are regular game sessions in Sydney that you can play now!  These sessions are in Surrey Hills and run on the first and third Thursday of the month.  Check out their Facebook page for more information if you would like to attend.

I may see a Thursday night flight down to Sydney one long weekend in the near future…

Be sure that I will be posting more about Blood on the Clocktower over the next few months, including when the Kickstarter is available.

Until next time,

JohnHQLD